Gary D. Sharp’s Resume

Biographical Sketch
Gary Duane SHARP

Education: Primary and secondary schools in San Diego, California

Bachelor of Science, Zoology (1967); San Diego State Univ.

Master of Science, Biology (1968), San Diego State Univ.

Doctor of Philosophy, Marine Biology (1972), Univ. of Calif.

San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Employment:

Present Climatology, Technology and Fisheries Applications, Consulting

1961-1965 U.S.Air Force.

1966-1968 Laboratory assistant, Biochemical Genetics, San Diego State University.

1968-1969 Biologist, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, La Jolla, California.

Researching tuna and pelagic fish physiology and behavior.

1969-1978

Senior Scientist, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, La Jolla,

Researching genetics and physiological ecology of tunas.

As a result of my early multidisciplinary approach to tuna research, and applied science, in 1976 I convened a Workshop, and edited with Andy Dizon, a volume entitled The Physiological Ecology of Tunas, which was published in 1978.

1978-1983

Fisheries Resources Officer, Fisheries Resources and Environment Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, Rome, Italy. Responsible for the evaluation and promotion of global tuna fishery research and development; I was mediator for two International Commissions for the management of tunas; I was also generally responsible for the promotion of appropriate climate-ocean research related to marine fisheries, including promotion of the FAO/IOC Ocean Sciences in Support of Living Resources Program.

My first summer in residence in Rome, I compiled the relevant oceanographic information for the Indian Ocean, to produce a series of monthly maps of vulnerability zones for tropical tunas, which were published by the Indian Ocean Fisheries Development Program. These maps instigated the development of high seas seining, and fish aggregating device (FAD) applications in the western Indian Ocean, the latter in collaboration with FAO Master fisherman, and colleague, Menakem Ben-Yami. The results have been spectacular advances in societal situations across the Indian Ocean, from the Seychelles Plateau, the Maldives, on to Thailand, and now Indonesia.

I was the senior editor of the fourth Edition of the FAO Atlas on Living Resources of the Sea, working to make the context of fisheries more dynamic, and realistic.

I planned, with my colleague, Jorge Csirke, and convened the 1983 Expert Consultation to Examine Changes in Distribution, Abundance and Species Composition for Neritic Fish Resources. The 1300pp. Proceedings was a compilation of information about climate-driven responses in regional fisheries. This was my final project during my five year contract with FAO. I left FAO to allow these concepts time to emerge.

1983- Present:

Independent Consultant in ocean resources related climate-oceanography, science programs and research planning; fish stock identification via genetic and morphometric studies; oceanic fishery development and recruitment; design of management information systems.

1987 to 1989:
]I was under contract to NOAA from to help develop an integrated Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring Program, and;

1990 to 1991:

While acting as Consulting Science Advisor to the Undersecretary of Oceans and Atmosphere, one of my activities was to stimulate implementation of a high resolution chronostratigraphy studies program in NOAA while assigned to the NOAA Center for Ocean Analysis and Prediction as Visiting Scientist, via UCAR. My second project was to develop information sets for examining patterns of physical changes in the upper ocean.

1991 to Present:

I initiated the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Integrated Ocean Sciences, (CIRIOS) a joint institute between NOAA and the Naval Postgraduate School while active Associate Research Professorship at the Naval Postgraduate School, Department of Oceanography. I am presently the Executive Scientific Director, for CIRIOS@Foundation CSUMB,

993-to Present:

Adjunct Professor, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

1995-1997:

Technology and Curriculum Development Planner, CSU Monterey Bay

Recent Related Projects and Experience:

The topics of Climate and Global Change, and applications of climate and upper ocean monitoring related to aquatic resources have been the major emphases of my studies since the early 1970s, but my focus has broadened from high seas fisheries to encompass climate related zoogeography, fisheries dynamics, and management opportunities. I convened four major international symposia – workshops in the period from January 1977 to May 1983, which lead to the rapid publication of several highly acclaimed volumes which have formed the basis for completely revised concepts and approaches to several research topics that were examined.

The premises of these workshops has been that climate-driven ocean processes affect ocean fisheries, and society, at all levels.

My major responsibilities over the last decade have included continuous promotion and monitoring of marine research related to climate and oceanographic mediated processes, with particular emphasis on ocean fisheries. For example, in June through August of 1985 I was contracted by the Fisheries Department of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, in Rome, to design an Ocean Monitoring and Recruitment Monitoring/Forecasting System for the Chilean Government.

From October 1986 to 1989

I worked directly with the Assistant Administrator of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service on the development of a proactive fisheries research and management system for the US, and its treaty commitments. Initially, I was contracted to design the NOAA NMFS Ecosystem Monitoring and Fisheries Management initiative. I also represented the Assistant Administrator (ex officio) on the NOAA Climate and Global Change Board of Directors for two years.

January 1989

I was nominated as Visiting Scientist at NOAA’s Center for Ocean Analysis and Prediction. Roger Y. Anderson (a paleoscience colleague, and also a NOAA Visiting Scientist) and I coordinated our efforts to develop appropriate in situ observational and research systems that would facilitate various categories of high resolution sediments, corals, and other accretion process data to be related to atmospheric and hydrologic processes for the recent period of instrumental records as well as paleoclimate contexts. This included several meetings with NSF, EPA, USGS, NOAA staff and an array of academics with shared interests and some with Committee on Earth Sciences responsibilities. Since these initial discussions and since our respective subsequent reports were made available throughout the high resolution paleoclimate community, several collaborations formed and efforts to obtain funding for the key aspects of our approach have been successful and are now emerging as major NSF Earth System History (ESH) Program area, which Roger Y. Anderson continues to lead. Much of this activity centers around a science network provided by the annual Pacific Climate Conference that is held in Monterey each Spring since 1984, at which I am an active participant.

I often convene topical sessions (or attend) AMS, ASLO, AGU and AAAS and selected foreign symposia/meetings each year, following my interests in marine ecological consequences of climate variations. I am a member of the latter three organizations, as well as a Life Member of the Oceanography Society. I was an invited participant at the International Symposium on Long-term Variation of Pelagic Fish and their Environment, held in Japan in November 1989; the International Symposium on Operational Fisheries Oceanography, held in Newfoundland in October, 1990: The Nova Scotian Longliner’s Conference, 1991, the Benguela Trophic Functioning Symposium held in Cape Town in September 1991; the Latin American Colloquium on Marine Sciences in Coquimbo, Chile, in October 1991, the Canadian Society of Zoologist’s Symposium on Conservation Issues, in Spring, 1996, in St. John’s, NFLD, a special AAAS session on Applied Science in the Coastal Regime, San Jose, CA, summer 1996.

Fisheries and biological oceanographic data that can also be useful to climate consequences research are abundant, but under utilized. This is primarily due to these data being inaccessible. Hidden data preclude rational management.

In the recent decade since I left FAO I have participated in several international panels and workshops to define climate related consequences in fisheries and marine ecological contexts. Among these the following have produced reports to which I have made contributions:

IOC/SCOR Working Group 65 workshop about on and offshore exchanges of energy and material flows, Tiburon, California in April 1986; Assessment of Impact of Climate Variations, held in Laxenburg, Austria during June/July 1986; I wrote background materials for the initial Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports, which were combined with other materials by Dr. John Everrett of NOAA NMFS, US representative to IPPC Working Group 2. I am continuing to support Dr. Everrett’s IPPC activities. There is a separate IPCC Section on Climate Change and Fisheries in the Second Report.

I have also participated in UNEP workshops on Climate and ENSO, as well as regional Climate Consequences discussions, in Bangkok, and Hanoi in 1991, and at NCAR in Boulder, Colorado in 1992. I convened a joint EPA/Texas Institute of Oceanography and NOAA workshop was held in Galveston Texas, 8-12 January, 1990, Climate Change and Ocean Processes: What are the Consequences?

I wrote the FAO Department of Fisheries Position Paper on Climate Change, in consultation with my colleagues at FAO, in preparation for the UNCED in Brazil, in June, 1992.

Related Special Interests:

Understanding and in situ data are required in order to relate climate information (seasonal weather) to societally relevant consequences. Facilitating this has become my principal focus in recent years. Following the decades-long indulgences in statistical correlations utilizing SST in climate and fisheries research, and the near uselessness and indefensibility of the results from conventional stock assessment activities, fisheries are in decline worldwide. Little or no forcastive capabilities exist amongst conventional fisheries trained scientists, or their tools. The issue remains that too little attention has been given to subsurface ocean observations, related climate research, in situ process research, and to the role of climate-driven ocean variability on aquatic species distributions and abundance changes related to local responses by ecosystems. These studies are crucial to interpretation of fisheries information for management purposes, as well as to creation of credible climate change scenarios from any generation of General Circulation Models.

My graphical/numeric compilations of World Ocean, monthly, one-by-one degree oceanographic data provided access for me and others to identify probable opportunities for several ocean fisheries. Also, they allow physical dynamic characterization of the more interesting small and large scale frontal and transition zone fisheries of the world. As I continue to improve its format, the data sets now provide greater insight into the dynamics of the upper ocean than has been generally appreciated. During the recent three years I have been enhancing desk top computer tools to allow ready access and visualization of these dynamics. I have also been compiling informative global climate and ocean data sets for evaluations of short and long term trends and comparisons between important regions of the world.

I have demonstrated these tools and projects to many scientists and decision makers, and the consensus is that they are generally useful for teaching, particularly time series studies and displays of climate processes over large geographic extents, and particularly where monthly/seasonal information sets exists for many years. I use these tools in presentations, to emphasize dynamics.

Lifelong Learning:

My early research and publications were diverse and mostly applications of novel techniques or methods for examining the basic assumptions and practices of marine resources related sciences. Topics ranged from basic biochemical genetics, through molecular physiology to the physiological ecology of pelagic species such as the tunas and delphinid cetaceans, on to ecosystem monitoring for fisheries purposes and management applications.

My more recent publications (since 1981) reflect my efforts to compile and disseminate global information about marine ecosystem and fisheries responses to climate-driven ocean variabilities. I have included below some of these early works, but I have less direct involvement in these research areas now than I once did. However, since the Monterey Bay Aquarium chose to create its Outer Bay exhibit including yellowfin and skipjack tunas, there has been ample opportunity to interact with the limited expertise pool that includes such long-time colleagues as Professors Barbara Block, Dennis Powers, George Somero, and the all-important chief keeper of the exhibit, Charles Farwell. This opportunity and other related activities helps me maintain contact with many of the more innovative researchers in fish genetics, fish aging, and physiological ecology. These topics are indispensable to understanding fishery variability, and climate related ecological responses.

Community Activities:

I have worked with various components of the local city, county and regional government bodies toward the design and implementation of a Central California Environmental Information System that would service the broadest possible suite of interests. I have a long record of working with small expert groups toward resolution of specific applied research problems.

I have been active in the development of the initial CSUMB Science Curriculum and Planning, and in Staff selection activities since 1993. I was employed by CSUMB in September, 1995 as the Technology and Curriculum Integration Planner to provide vision, leadership, strategic planning and coordination of a revolutionary plan for academic and administrative university-wide Technology-based Curriculum Integration technologies.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Electrophoretic study of tuna hemoglobins. 1969. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 31:749-755. (MS Thesis).

Studies of Biochemical Genetics of Yellowfin Tuna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. 1972. (Ph. D. Thesis), University of California at San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

An electrophoretic study of some scombroid fishes and related forms. 1973. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 44B:381-388.

Mercury in tunas: a review. 1973. Fish. Bull., U.S., 71:(3):603-615. (with W.L. Klawe

A comparison of the O2 Dissociation properties of the hemoglobins of some delphinid cetaceans. 1975. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 51A:673-681.

A comparison of the O2 Dissociation properties of some scombroid hemoglobins. 1975. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 51A:683-691.

An energetic model for the exploited yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, population in the eastern Pacific Ocean. 1976. Fish. Bull., U.S., 74(1):36-50. with R.C. Francis.

Vulnerability of tunas as a function of environmental profiles. (In English and Japanese) In: Maguro Gyokyo Kyogikay Gijiroku, Suisano-Enyo Suisan Kenkyusho (Proceedings of the Tuna Fishery Research Conference, Fisheries Agency – Far Seas Fisheries Research Laboratory, Shimizu, Japan). 1976.

Energy for migration in albacore, Thunnus alalunga. 1977. Fish. Bull., U.S., 75:(2):447-450. with R.C. Dotson.

The distribution of red and white swimming muscles, their biochemistry, and the biochemical phylogeny of selected scombrid fishes. pp. 41-78 In: The Physiological Ecology of Tunas. (G.D. Sharp and A.E. Dizon, eds.) Academic Press. San Francisco and New York. 1978. with S.W. Pirages.

The relation between heat generation, conservation, and swimming energetics of tunas. pp. 213-232 In: The Physiological Ecology of Tunas. (G.D. Sharp and A.E. Dizon, eds.) Academic Press. San Francisco and New York. 1978. with W.J. Vlymen, III.

Behavioral and physiological properties of tunas and their effects on vulnerability to fishing gear. pp. 397-449 In: The Physiological Ecology of Tunas. (G.D. Sharp and A.E. Dizon, eds.) Academic Press. San Francisco and New York. 1978.

Perspectives: the past, present, and future of tuna physiology. pp. 451-458 In: The Physiological Ecology of Tunas. (G.D. Sharp and A.E. Dizon, eds.) Academic Press. San Francisco and New York. 1978. with A.E. Dizon.

Areas of potentially successful exploitation of tunas in the Indian Ocean with emphasis on surface methods. Indian Ocean Programme, FAO, Rome, Tech. Reports IOFC/DEV/79/47. 50pp. 1979.

Biochemical genetic studies, their value and limitations in stock identification and discrimination. pp. 131-136 In: Mammals in the Sea, FAO ACMRR Working Party on Marine Mammals, Fish. Ser.(5) Vol.3. 1981.

Colonization: modes of opportunism in the ocean. pp. 125-148 In: Report and Documentation of the Workshop on the Effects of Environmental Variation on the Survival of Larval Pelagic Fishes. (G.D. Sharp, convenor). IOC Workshop Series No. 28, Unesco, Paris. 1981.

Report of the Workshop on Effects of Environmental Variation on the Survival of Larval Pelagic Fishes. pp. 1-47 In: Report and Documentation of the Workshop on the Effects of Environmental Variation on the Survival of Larval Pelagic Fishes. (G.D. Sharp, convenor). IOC Workshop Series No. 28, Unesco, Paris. 1981.

Report on the research status and potential for cod rearing in the North Atlantic. from a meeting of consultants held in Svanoy, Norway from 209 August, 1981. FAO/Norway Trust Funds. 13pp.

Atlas of Living Resources of the Sea. FAO Publication. (G.D. Sharp and J.-P. Troadec, eds.) Fourth Edition. 1981.

Foreword to the Symposium. 1982 Collect. Vol. Sci. Pap. ICCAT /Recl. Doc. Sci. CICTA/Colecc. Doc. Cient. CICAA, VolXVII (SCRS-1981)(2):431-438.

Ocean sciences in support of living marine resources: a report. 1982. Canad. J. Fish. Aq. Sci. 39(7):1059-1070. (A.Bakun, J.Beyer, D.Pauly, J.G.Pope, and G.D.Sharp).

Trends in respiratory work and ecological position in the marine ecosystem. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 76A(3):405-412. Proceedings of Symposium on Comparative Cardiac Function in Lower Vertebrates, B. Tota and O. Poupa, eds. 1983.

Neritic systems and fisheries: their perturbations, natural and man induced. pp. 155-202 In: Ecosystems of the World: Part 27. Ecosystems of Continental Shelves (H. Postma and J.J.Zijlstra, eds.). Elseviers Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam-Oxford-New York. 1988.

Physics and fish populations: shelf sea fronts and fisheries. pp. 659-682 In: Proceedings of the Expert Consultation to Examine the Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources, Sharp, G.D. and J. Csirke, eds. San Jose, Costa Rica, 18-29 April 1983. FAO Fish. Rep. Ser. 291, vol. 2, with J. Hunter.

Modeling Fisheries: What was the question? pp. 1177-1224 In: Proceedings of the Expert Consultation to Examine the Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources, Sharp, G.D. and J. Csirke, eds. San Jose, Costa Rica, 18-29 April 1983. FAO Fish. Rep. Ser. 291, vol. 3

Tuna fisheries, elusive stock boundaries and illusory stock concepts. 1983 Collect. Vol. Sci. Pap. ICCAT /Recl. Doc. Sci. CICTA/Colecc. Doc. Cient. CICAA, VolXVII (3)812-829.

Ecological efficiency and activity metabolism. pp. 459-474 In: Flows of Energy and Materials in Marine Ecosystems: theory and practice . M.J.R. Fasham, ed. Plenum Press. New York and London. 1984.

Sharp, G.D. and J. Csirke, eds. 1983: Proceedings of the Expert Consultation to Examine the Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources, San Jose, Costa Rica, 18-29 April 1983. FAO Fish. Rep. Ser. 291, vols. 2-3. 1294pp.

Csirke, J. and G.D. Sharp, eds. 1983: Report of the Expert Consultation to Examine the Changes in Abundance and Species Composition of Neritic Fish Resources, San Jose, Costa Rica, 18-29 April 1983. FAO Fish. Rep. Ser. 291, vol 1. 100pp.

Climate and fisheries: Cause and effect and the quest for elusive time series. 1986. pp. 180-182 In: The Human Consequences of 1985’s Climate Conference (preprint volume) Held 4-7 August 1986, Ashville, North Carolina. American Meteorological Society.

Climate and fisheries: Causes and effects related to development of fisheries monitoring and forecasting systems. Prepared for: Report of the Task Force Meeting on Policy-Oriented Assessment of Impact of Climate Variations, held in Laxenburg, Austria, 30 June-2 July 1986. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).

An Ecological Framework for Marine Fishery Investigations. 1987. FAO Tech. Paper 283. 152 pp. (with John F. Caddy), available in English and Spanish.

Climate and Fisheries: cause and effect or managing the long and short of it all. 1987. In: The Benguela and Comparable Ecosystems. (Payne, A.I.L., J.A. Gulland and K.H. Brink, eds.) So. Afr. J. Mar. Sci. 5:811-838.

Climate and Fisheries: Cause and Effect – A system review. 1991: pp. 239-258. In: Long-term Variability of Pelagic Fish Populations and Their Environment. (T. Kawasaki, S. Tanaka, Y. Toba and A. Taniguchi, eds.) Pergamon Press, Tokyo.

Climate Change, the Indian Ocean Tuna Fishery, and Empiricism. 1992: pp. 377-416 In: Climate Variability, Climate Change and Fisheries. M.H. Glantz, ed., Cambridge University Press.

Fishery Catch Records, ENSO, and Longer Term Climate Change as Inferred from Fish Remains From Marine Sediments. 1992: PP. 379-417 In: Paleoclimatology of El Niño – Southern Oscillation, H. Diaz and V. Markgraf, eds., Cambridge University Press.

Pieces of the Puzzle: Anecdotes, Time Series and Insights. 1993. In: Benguela Trophic Functioning Symposium, (A.I.L. Payne, et al. eds.) So. African J. Mar. Sci. 12: 1079-1992.

Comments on the global ocean observing capabilities, indicator species as climate proxies, and the need for timely ocean monitoring. 1993. Oceanography, 5(3):163-168. Sharp, G.D. and D.R. McLain.

Fisheries, El Niño-Southern Oscillation and upper ocean temperature records: an eastern Pacific example. 1993. Oceanography, 6(1): 13-22. Sharp, G.D. and D.R. McLain.

Recruitment in Flatfish: Lines for Future Research. 1994. Netherl. J. Sea Res. 32(2):227-230.

Its About Time: new beginnings and old good ideas in fisheries science. 1995. Fisheries Oceanography. 4(4): 324-341.

Arabian Sea Fisheries and Their Production Contexts. 1995. pp. 239-264 In: Arabian Sea Oceanography and Fisheries, Karachi, Pakistan.

Skipjack velocity, dwell time and migration. 1996. Fisheries Oceanography, . 5(2):100-113. R.W. Gauldie and G.D. Sharp.

The Oceanography of the Indonesian Archipelago. 1996. Chapter 2 In: Fisheries of the South China Sea and the Indonesian Archipelago, Pauly and >>>, eds. ICLARM, Manila, Philippines.

Recent Manuscripts in Press:

The Case for Dome-Shaped response Curves by Fish Populations, in press, CEOS Workshop, Monterey, California, September, 1994.

Its About Time: Rethinking fisheries management. In Press (1996) In: Proceedings of the Second World Fisheries Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Recent Invited Talks, Book Reviews and Presentations:

Climate and fisheries: Cause and effect and the quest for elusive time series. pp. 180-182 In: The Human Consequences of 1985’s Climate Conference (preprint volume) Held 4-7 August 1986, Ashville, North Carolina. American Meteorological Society.

Climate and fisheries: Causes and effects in energy flows among coastal and offshore areas. Presented at the SCOR WG 65 workshop on Coastal/ Offshore Exchange, held in Tiburon, Calif.,7-11 April 1986.

Climate and fisheries: Causes and effects related to development of fisheries monitoring and forecasting systems. Prepared for: Report of the Task Force Meeting on Policy-Oriented Assessment of Impact of Climate Variations, held in Laxenburg, Austria, 30 June-2 July 1986. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).

Climate and Fisheries: Cause and effect, or managing the long and short of it all. Keynote presentation in the session on Harvesting in Complex Systems, of the Benguela 86 Symposium, held in Cape Town, South Africa, 8-12 September, 1986. Program Review Team member.

Climate and fisheries: Cause and Effect, long and short term patterns and processes. Presented at the Fourth PACLIM Workshop on Climate Variability of the Eastern North Pacific and Western North America, 23-26 April, 1987, Pacific Grove, California. I have attended and participated in the annual Pacific Climate Conference, held at Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, providing posters and computer demonstrations, since 1987.

Resource Management In Whole Systems Contexts, Contracted Resource Document for FAO/Japan Workshop on Fisheries and World Food Security.

Arabian Sea Fisheries, Climate Change, and Regional Patterns. National Fisheries Institute, Karachi, Pakistan, September, 1993.

Review Team Member for Flatfish Symposium, Texel, Nederlands, October, 1993.

Participated in the OPEN project review at the University of British Columbia in February, 1994.

Participated in the February 1995 NSF GLOBEC Northeastern Pacific Planning Meeting and research review session in Seattle , Washington.

Invited Speaker Canadian Society of Zoologists, Symposium on Applied Science in Fisheries Management, Memorial University, St. John’s, Newfoundland, May 1996.

Workshop on the Status of Global Fisheries Management, November, 1996, Monterey Institute for International Studies, Monterey, California.

Recent Posters, Abstracts and Magazine Articles:

Poster: Atmosphere, Ocean and Terrestrial Clues to Climate Linkages. Abstract, The Oceanography Society Meeting, St. Peterburg, Fl. March 1991. Graphical presentation of sources and implications of various data time series derived from sediments, fisheries catch data, and COADS.

Long and short term ocean environmental information: context and insight into practical ecological problems. Abstract, The Pacific Science Congress, Honolulu, HI, June 1991. Session Chair.

Time Series – Graphical Spread Sheets. Presentation. Abstract, Pacific Congress on Marine Science and Technology, June 1992, Kona, Hawaii. Session Chair.

Climate and Fisheries: Cause and Effect: The formulation of an appropriate fisheries modeling context. Presented , Abstract. Fall 1988 American Fisheries Society meeting in Toronto.

The initiation of a major oceanic tuna fishery from a purely physical basis. in press. Presented at the International Symposium on Operational Fisheries Oceanography, 23-27 October, 1989, St. John’s, Newfoundland.

Pieces of the Puzzle. Coast and Ocean Magazine, Vol.7 (1), February 1991.

Atmosphere, Ocean and Terrestrial Clues to Climate Linkages. The Oceanography Society Meeting, St. Petersburg, Florida, March 1991. (poster and abstract).

Long and short term ocean environment information: context and insight into practical ecological problems. Presented at the Pacific Science Congress, Honolulu, Hawaii, June 1991 (abstract only).

Climate and Fisheries: cause and effect – ENSO and longer cycles. pp. 387-390 In: Long-Term Variability of Pelagic Fish Populations and Their Environment. T. Kawasaki, S. Tanaka, Y. Toba and A. Taniguchi, eds. Pergamon Press, Tokyo, Oxford. Poster abstract with K.T. Dorsey and D.R. McLain. 1991.

Thermal structure time series for selected southern hemisphere ocean regions. Poster for the American Meteorological Society and Southern Oceanography Meetings held in Hobart, Tasmania, March 1993. with K.T. Dorsey and D.R. McLain.

Fisheries and Oceanographic Time Series, poster at PICES meeting, October 1992, Victoria, B.C.

Time series and pelagic fisheries research problems. Invited talk given at CSIRO Fisheries laboratories, Hobart, Tasmania. March 1993.

Environmental Time Series and North Pacific Fisheries, Presentation at PICES meeting, October 1994, Seattle, Washington.

Arabian Sea Fisheries and Their Production Contexts. pp239-264 In: Arabian Sea Oceanography and Fisheries, Thompson and Tirmizi, eds. Karachi, Pakistan. 1995.

Gauldie, R.W. and G.D. Sharp. 1995. Skipjack velocity, dwell time, and migration. Fish. Oceanog.5(2):100-113.

The Oceanography of the Indonesian Archipelago, pp. 7-14. In: Fisheries of the South China Sea and the Indonesian Archipelago, Pauly and Martosubroto, eds. ICLARM, Manila, Philippines. 1996.

Resource Management In Whole Systems Contexts, in review, FAO Contract for Japan Workshop on Fisheries and World Food Security.

The Case for Dome-Shaped response Curves by Fish Populations, in press, CEOS Workshop, Monterey, California, September, Cambridge Press. 1997.

Its About Time: Rethinking fisheries managemement. pp731-736. In: Developing and Sustaining World Fisheries Resources: The state of science and management. Hancock, Smith, Grant and Beumer, eds. CSIRO, Australia. 1997.

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